1. Facts vs. the GOP: Why America is living through a new era of segregation

    Reblogged from: ultralaser
  2. 99 Ways to Respect Black Women by Hope Wabuke

    unapproachableblackchicks:

    Screen shot 2013-08-23 at 2.00.01 PM

    .

    1. Do not rape us.
    2. Do not make jokes about raping us.
    3. Do not abuse us.
    4. Do not jail us if we do defend ourselves from those who try to rape and abuse us.
    5. Do not deny these things have happened, these things are happening. Do not deny that this is the painful…
    Reblogged from: unapproachableblackchicks
  3. think-progress:

In Connecticut, African Americans are twice as likely as whites to have their cars searched by cops.
    Reblogged from: think-progress
  4. kyssthis16:

    postracialcomments:

    Ferguson

    I

    Reblogged from: generalbriefing
  5. mediamattersforamerica:

    Pull yourself together, Fox. This is just embarrassing.

    Reblogged from: mediamattersforamerica
  6. We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was “well timed” in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word “Wait!” It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This “Wait” has almost always meant “Never.” We must come to see, with one of our distinguished jurists, that “justice too long delayed is justice denied.”
    Reblogged from: azspot
  7. It is physically and emotionally draining to be called upon to prove that these systems of power exist. For many of us, just struggling against them is enough — now you want us to break them down for you? Imagine having weights tied to your feet and a gag around your mouth, and then being asked to explain why you think you are at an unfair disadvantage. Imagine watching a video where a young man promises to kill women who chose not to sleep with him and then being forced to engage with the idea that maybe you are just a hysterical feminist seeing misogyny where there is none. It is incredibly painful to feel that in order for you to care about my safety, I have to win this verbal contest you have constructed “for fun.”

    An open letter to privileged people who play devil’s advocate (via brutereason)

    UGGHHHHH so true. Y’all speaking truth to life. Keep it coming. I’m in love with the eloquence.

    (via ceemee)

    Never trust anyone who says, “well, just to play devil’s advocate,” when you are having conversations about real life experiences. They are not your friends. They don’t care about you.

    Reblogged from: knowledgeequalsblackpower
  8. fughtopia:

Aboriginal deaths in custody. After deaths peaked in 1995 they have fallen until 2006 when for two consecutive years more Aboriginal people died in police or prison custody than before [5]. Note that starting in 1990 figures include deaths in police custody.
source: http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/law/royal-commission-into-aboriginal-deaths-in-custody

    fughtopia:

    Aboriginal deaths in custody. After deaths peaked in 1995 they have fallen until 2006 when for two consecutive years more Aboriginal people died in police or prison custody than before [5]. Note that starting in 1990 figures include deaths in police custody.

    source: http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/law/royal-commission-into-aboriginal-deaths-in-custody

    Reblogged from: fughtopia
  9. jessehimself:

culturalandhistoricalvibes:

Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.
Click to see source:

    jessehimself:

    culturalandhistoricalvibes:

    Walter S. McAfee is the African American mathematician and physicist who first calculated the speed of the moon. McAfee participated in Project Diana in the 1940s - a U.S. Army program, created to determine whether a high frequency radio signal could penetrate the earth’s outer atmosphere. To test this, scientists wanted to bounce a radar signal off the moon and back to earth. But the moon was a swiftly moving target, impossible to hit without knowing its exact speed. McAfee made the necessary calculations, and on January 10, 1946, the team sent a radar pulse through a special 40-feet square antenna towards the moon. Two and a half seconds later, they received a faint signal, proving that transmissions from earth could cross the vast distances of outer space. Official news of this scientific breakthrough did not include McAfee’s name, nor was there any recognition of the essential role he played. But Americans could not have walked on the moon had it not been for Walter S. McAfee and his calculations.

    Click to see source:

    Reblogged from: jessehimself
  10. 
[Image that says:
Effects of racism on white children: 
-Denial of reality-Rationalization-Rigid thinking-Superiority-Fear and hatred
Effect of racism on children of color:
-Overidentification with white people-Separation and alienation -Confusion and bewilderment-Rejection-Shame-Anger and Rage
[Roots & Wings: Affirming Culture in Early Childhood Programs, Written by Stacey York, Published by Redleaf Press, 2003.]

    [Image that says:

    Effects of racism on white children: 

    -Denial of reality
    -Rationalization
    -Rigid thinking
    -Superiority
    -Fear and hatred

    Effect of racism on children of color:

    -Overidentification with white people
    -Separation and alienation 
    -Confusion and bewilderment
    -Rejection
    -Shame
    -Anger and Rage

    [Roots & Wings: Affirming Culture in Early Childhood Programs, Written by Stacey York, Published by Redleaf Press, 2003.]

    Reblogged from: abagond
  11. soulbrotherv2:

They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I by Kidada E. Williams 
Well after slavery was abolished, its legacy of violence left deep wounds on African Americans’ bodies, minds, and lives. For many victims and witnesses of the assaults, rapes, murders, nightrides, lynchings, and other bloody acts that followed, the suffering this violence engendered was at once too painful to put into words yet too horrible to suppress.
 In this evocative and deeply moving history Kidada Williams examines African Americans’ testimonies about racial violence. By using both oral and print culture to testify about violence, victims and witnesses hoped they would be able to graphically disseminate enough knowledge about its occurrence and inspire Americans to take action to end it. In the process of testifying, these people created a vernacular history of the violence they endured and witnessed, as well as the identities that grew from the experience of violence. This history fostered an oppositional consciousness to racial violence that inspired African Americans to form and support campaigns to end violence. The resulting crusades against racial violence became one of the political training grounds for the civil rights movement.
[book link ]

    soulbrotherv2:

    They Left Great Marks on Me: African American Testimonies of Racial Violence from Emancipation to World War I by Kidada E. Williams 

    Well after slavery was abolished, its legacy of violence left deep wounds on African Americans’ bodies, minds, and lives. For many victims and witnesses of the assaults, rapes, murders, nightrides, lynchings, and other bloody acts that followed, the suffering this violence engendered was at once too painful to put into words yet too horrible to suppress.

     In this evocative and deeply moving history Kidada Williams examines African Americans’ testimonies about racial violence. By using both oral and print culture to testify about violence, victims and witnesses hoped they would be able to graphically disseminate enough knowledge about its occurrence and inspire Americans to take action to end it. In the process of testifying, these people created a vernacular history of the violence they endured and witnessed, as well as the identities that grew from the experience of violence. This history fostered an oppositional consciousness to racial violence that inspired African Americans to form and support campaigns to end violence. The resulting crusades against racial violence became one of the political training grounds for the civil rights movement.

    [book link ]

    Reblogged from: soulbrotherv2
  12. http://www.nyarlo.net/post/97625727348/the-goddamazon-pax-arabica-hey-so-remember

    the-goddamazon:

    pax-arabica:

    Hey, so remember how Israel always falls over itself reminding us how much it cares about the well-being of the LGBTQ community? How it’s the “only safe haven for queer people in the middle east”? How it benevolently cares for injured Palestinians even…

    Reblogged from: ultralaser
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